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All the Single Ladies
Cover of All the Single Ladies
All the Single Ladies
Unmarried Women and the Rise of an Independent Nation
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A nuanced investigation into the sexual, economic, and emotional lives of women in America, this "singularly triumphant work" (Los Angeles Times) by Rebecca Traister "the most brilliant voice on feminism in the country" (Anne Lamott) is "sure to be vigorously discussed" (Booklist, starred review).
In 2009, the award-winning journalist Rebecca Traister started All the Single Ladies—a book she thought would be a work of contemporary journalism—about the twenty-first century phenomenon of the American single woman. It was the year the proportion of American women who were married dropped below fifty percent; and the median age of first marriages, which had remained between twenty and twenty-two years old for nearly a century (1890–1980), had risen dramatically to twenty-seven.
But over the course of her vast research and more than a hundred interviews with academics and social scientists and prominent single women, Traister discovered a startling truth: the phenomenon of the single woman in America is not a new one. And historically, when women were given options beyond early heterosexual marriage, the results were massive social change—temperance, abolition, secondary education, and more.
Today, only twenty percent of Americans are wed by age twenty-nine, compared to nearly sixty percent in 1960. The Population Reference Bureau calls it a "dramatic reversal." All the Single Ladies is a remarkable portrait of contemporary American life and how we got here, through the lens of the single American woman. Covering class, race, sexual orientation, and filled with vivid anecdotes from fascinating contemporary and historical figures, All the Single Ladies is destined to be a classic work of social history and journalism. Exhaustively researched, brilliantly balanced, and told with Traister's signature wit and insight, this book should be shelved alongside Gail Collins's When Everything Changed.

A nuanced investigation into the sexual, economic, and emotional lives of women in America, this "singularly triumphant work" (Los Angeles Times) by Rebecca Traister "the most brilliant voice on feminism in the country" (Anne Lamott) is "sure to be vigorously discussed" (Booklist, starred review).
In 2009, the award-winning journalist Rebecca Traister started All the Single Ladies—a book she thought would be a work of contemporary journalism—about the twenty-first century phenomenon of the American single woman. It was the year the proportion of American women who were married dropped below fifty percent; and the median age of first marriages, which had remained between twenty and twenty-two years old for nearly a century (1890–1980), had risen dramatically to twenty-seven.
But over the course of her vast research and more than a hundred interviews with academics and social scientists and prominent single women, Traister discovered a startling truth: the phenomenon of the single woman in America is not a new one. And historically, when women were given options beyond early heterosexual marriage, the results were massive social change—temperance, abolition, secondary education, and more.
Today, only twenty percent of Americans are wed by age twenty-nine, compared to nearly sixty percent in 1960. The Population Reference Bureau calls it a "dramatic reversal." All the Single Ladies is a remarkable portrait of contemporary American life and how we got here, through the lens of the single American woman. Covering class, race, sexual orientation, and filled with vivid anecdotes from fascinating contemporary and historical figures, All the Single Ladies is destined to be a classic work of social history and journalism. Exhaustively researched, brilliantly balanced, and told with Traister's signature wit and insight, this book should be shelved alongside Gail Collins's When Everything Changed.

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About the Author-
  • Rebecca Traister is writer at large for New York Magazine and a contributing editor at Elle. A National Magazine Award finalist, she has written about women in politics, media and entertainment from a feminist perspective for The New Republic and Salon and has also contributed to The Nation, The New York Observer, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Vogue, Glamour and Marie Claire. Traister's first book, Big Girls Don't Cry, about women and the 2008 election, was a New York Times Notable Book of 2010 and the winner of the Ernesta Drinker Ballard Book Prize. She lives in New York with her family.
Reviews-
  • AudioFile Magazine In 2009, the percentage of American women who were not married surpassed 50 percent. Traister's important book examines that phenomenon. Narrator Candace Thaxton handles both the exposition and the interviews with passion, drawing on the indignation of some of the interviewees who defend their decision to delay or forgo marriage, often in defiance of family and friends. Thaxton gives a nuanced presentation yet speaks with conviction about a culture that struggles to adjust to self-reliant women who throw off expectations that the ultimate goal of their lives is a wedding, marriage, and children. Maintaining the tone of an observer who has empathy for her subjects, Thaxton is engaged with their struggles and takes pleasure in their successes. J.E.M. © AudioFile 2016, Portland, Maine
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All the Single Ladies
All the Single Ladies
Unmarried Women and the Rise of an Independent Nation
Rebecca Traister
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