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How to Eat Fried Worms
Cover of How to Eat Fried Worms
How to Eat Fried Worms
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Because of a bet, Billy is in the uncomfortable position of having to eat fifteen worms in fifteen days. The worms are supplied by his opponent, whose motto is "The bigger and juicier, the better!" At first Billy's problem is whether or not he can swallow the worm placed before him, even with a choice of condiments from peanut butter to horseradish. But later it looks as if Billy will win, and the challenge becomes getting to the worm to eat it. Billy's family, after checking with the doctor, takes everything in stride. They even help Billy through his gastronomic ordeal, which twists and turns with each new day, leaving the outcome of the bet continually in doubt.
From the Paperback edition.
Because of a bet, Billy is in the uncomfortable position of having to eat fifteen worms in fifteen days. The worms are supplied by his opponent, whose motto is "The bigger and juicier, the better!" At first Billy's problem is whether or not he can swallow the worm placed before him, even with a choice of condiments from peanut butter to horseradish. But later it looks as if Billy will win, and the challenge becomes getting to the worm to eat it. Billy's family, after checking with the doctor, takes everything in stride. They even help Billy through his gastronomic ordeal, which twists and turns with each new day, leaving the outcome of the bet continually in doubt.
From the Paperback edition.
Available formats-
  • OverDrive Listen
  • OverDrive MP3 Audiobook
Languages:-
Copies-
  • Available:
    1
  • Library copies:
    1
Levels-
  • ATOS:
    3.5
  • Lexile:
    650
  • Interest Level:
    MG
  • Text Difficulty:
    3 - 6

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Excerpts-
  • From the book

    Chapter I: The Bet

    Hey, Tom! Where were you last night?"
    "Yeah, you missed it."
    Alan and Billy came up the front walk. Tom was sitting on his porch steps, bouncing a tennis ball.
    "Old Man Tator caught Joe as we were climbing through the fence, so we all had to go back, and he made us pile the peaches on his kitchen table, and then he called our mothers."
    "Joe's mother hasn't let him out yet."
    "Where were you?"
    Tom stopped bouncing the tennis ball. He was a tall, skinny boy who took his troubles very seriously.
    "My mother kept me in."
    "What for?"
    "I wouldn't eat my dinner."
    Alan sat down on the step below Tom and began to chew his thumbnail.
    "What was it?"
    "Salmon casserole."
    Billy flopped down on the grass, chunky, snub-nosed, freckled.
    "Salmon casserole's not so bad."
    "Wouldn't she let you just eat two bites?" asked Alan. "Sometimes my mother says, well, all right, if I'll just eat two bites."
    "I wouldn't eat even one."
    "That's stupid," said Billy. "One bite can't hurt you. I'd eat one bite of anything before I'd let them send me up to my room right after supper."
    Tom shrugged.
    "How about mud?" Alan asked Billy. "You wouldn't eat a bite of mud."
    Alan argued a lot, small, knobby-kneed, nervous, gnawing at his thumbnail, his face smudged, his red hair mussed, shirttail hanging out, shoelaces untied.
    "Sure, I would," Billy said. "Mud. What's mud? Just dirt with a little water in it. My father says everyone eats a pound of dirt every year anyway."
    "How about poison?"
    "That's different." Billy rolled over on his back.
    "Is your mother going to make you eat the leftovers today at lunch?" he asked Billy.
    "She never has before."
    "How about worms?" Alan asked Billy.
    Tom's sister's cat squirmed out from under the porch and rubbed against Billy's knee.
    "Sure," said Billy. "Why not? Worms are just dirt."
    "Yeah, but they bleed."
    "So you'd have to cook them. Cows bleed."
    "I bet a hundred dollars you wouldn't really eat a worm. You talk big now, but you wouldn't if you were sitting at the dinner table with a worm on your plate."
    "I bet I would. I'd eat fifteen worms if somebody'd bet me a hundred dollars."
    "You really want to bet? I'll bet you fifty dollars you can't eat fifteen worms. I really will."
    "Where're you going to get fifty dollars?"
    "In my savings account. I've got one hundred and thirty dollars and seventy-nine cents in my savings account. I know, because last week I put in the five dollars my grandmother gave me for my birthday."
    "Your mother wouldn't let you take it out."
    "She would if I lost the bet. She'd have to. I'd tell her I was going to sell my stamp collection otherwise. And I bought that with all my own money that I earned mowing lawns, so I can do whatever I want with it. I'll bet you fifty dollars you can't eat fifteen worms. Come on. You're chicken. You know you can't do it."
    "I wouldn't do it," said Tom. "If salmon casserole makes me sick, think what fifteen worms would do."
    Joe came scuffing up the walk and flopped down beside Billy. He was a small boy, with dark hair and a long nose and big brown eyes.
    "What's going on?"
    "Come on," said Alan to Billy. "Tom can be your second and Joe'll be mine, just like in a duel. You think it's so easy — here's your chance to make fifty bucks."
    Billy dangled a leaf in front of the cat, but the cat just rubbed against his knee, purring.
    "What kind of worms?"
    "Regular worms."
    "Not those big green ones that get on the tomatoes. I won't eat those. And I won't eat them all at once. It might make me sick. One worm a day for fifteen days."
    "And he can eat them any...
About the Author-
  • Thomas Rockwell is the author of a number of books for young readers. He was the recipient of the Mark Twain Award, the California Young Reader Medal, and the Sequoyah Award for How to Eat Fried Worms. He lives in Poughkeepsie, NY.
Reviews-
  • AudioFile Magazine What would you do for fifty dollars? Billy would buy the minibike he's been dreaming of. What's more, Alan knows Billy can't resist a bet, no matter how revolting. Rockwell's text is enhanced by musical interludes that range from folksy guitar strains at transitional points to mysterious and accelerated strumming that adds suspense. Sanders's youthful vocalizations give individual personalities to each of the boys in a presentation that will delight both children and adults. B.L.W. (c)AudioFile, Portland, Maine
  • School Library Journal, Starred "The clear writing, clever illustrations, and revolting subject matter are sure to make a hit with many middle-grade readers."
  • Booklist "A hilarious story that will revolt and delight. . . . The chapters march briefly and irresistibly on, worm by worm. The characters and their families and activities are natural to a T, and this, juxtaposed against the uncommon plot, makes for some colorful, original writing in a much-needed comic vein."
  • Kirkus Reviews "Rockwell's sensibilities (if that's the word) are so uncannily close to those of the average ten-year-old boy that one begins to admire Billy as a really sharp operator."
Title Information+
  • Publisher
    Penguin Random House Audio Publishing Group
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    Burn to CD: 
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    Public performance: 
    Not permitted
    File-sharing: 
    Not permitted
    Peer-to-peer usage: 
    Not permitted
    All copies of this title, including those transferred to portable devices and other media, must be deleted/destroyed at the end of the lending period.

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How to Eat Fried Worms
How to Eat Fried Worms
Thomas Rockwell
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